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Happy 20th Birthday!

Twenty years later, the 241 Toll Road continues to provide congestion relief for thousands of drivers

The year is 1998 – Bill Clinton is President, Titanic dominates the box office, gas is $1.06 a gallon, Google was just founded, and the first Harry Potter book is released. But, more importantly, a 24-mile segment of the 241 Toll Road, connecting the 91 Freeway to Irvine, opens. This segment provided drivers an alternative route to the congested 55 Freeway when traveling between Orange and Riverside Counties.

At the time, the project was one of the largest design/build contracts in U.S. history and was Orange County’s largest transportation project in a decade. Twenty years later, more than 60 million tolls are collected on the 241 Toll Road each year and it continues to provide congestion relief for hundreds of thousands of drivers every day.

We dug deep in our archives for some great construction photos and here are 20 fun facts to celebrate the 241 Toll Road’s 20th birthday.

With more than 320,000 daily trips on Orange County’s Toll Roads, that’s 320,000 less trips on the already congested 5, 55, and 405 freeways; thereby improving mobility for everyone – even those who don’t use it! The 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads continue to be the easiest and most predictable way to get to and through Orange County. Happy birthday – and thank you for providing drivers a choice for over 20 years.

Your Smooth Ride to Summer Fun

For many of us, Memorial Day marked the unofficial start of summer; however, the official start is June 21…just a couple days away!

On the bright side, things always look sunny on The Toll Roads of Orange County. The 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads make getting around Orange County easy for locals and out-of-town visitors. Here’s a look at four summer destinations easily accessible via The Toll Roads:

  1. Get artsy with Laguna Beach’s arts and culture

    The 73 and 133 Toll Roads offer easy access to Laguna Beach, Orange County’s classic beach town. Visitors can enjoy the creativity and artistry of annual art shows such as the upcoming Sawdust Art Festival and Laguna Art-A-Fair beginning June 29. And, each evening from July 7 – Sept. 1, the Festival of Arts Pageant of the Masters faithfully recreates classic and contemporary works of art into living pictures that feature real people. BONUS: FasTrak® and ExpressAccount® members who are opted in to the Rewards program and who drive at least once in June will be rewarded with 25 percent off Pageant of the Masters tickets and 2-for-1 admission to the Festival of Arts. Click here, to opt-in.

  2. Pack a picnic and head to Irvine Regional Park

    Take the 241 or 261 Toll Roads for easy access to the 491-acre Irvine Regional Park, where families have picnicked beneath the groves of oak and sycamore trees for more than 100 years. The OC Zoo is within the park boundaries and there are pony rides and the Irvine Regional Park Railroad, too. For more summer fun, check out the park’s free summer concerts (July 19 and July 26) and outdoor movies (July 27 and Aug. 3).

  3. “Free Your Inner Farmer” at the Orange County Fair

    From south Orange County, the 73 Toll Road to the 55 Freeway is the best way to get to the OC Fair. Visit the fairgrounds from July 13 to Aug. 12 for delicious food, carnival rides, concerts, farm animals, arts and crafts, monster trucks and more. BONUS: FasTrak and ExpressAccount members can receive $2 off admission to the OC Fair by opting in to receive promotions from The Toll Roads Rewards program. Click here to learn more.

  4. Rock out at Irvine concerts

    Take the 241 and/or 133 Toll Roads to the Orange County Great Park for a concert at the new Five Point Amphitheatre. More than just home to the Big Orange Balloon, the outdoor venue debuts with its first full season of summer shows under the stars, featuring top bands and artists from a variety of genres; plus food and drink options.
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Travel
If your summer plans take you further north, be sure to pack your FasTrak transponder. FasTrak is used to pay tolls on all of California’s tolled roads, lanes and bridges. You can use it on the 10 and 110 Express Lanes to access L.A. Live, California Science Center or Dodger Stadium.

 

And be sure to never miss one of Shohei Ohtani’s pitches. Drive the 241 Toll Road to bypass traffic on the 5 and 55 Freeways to catch a game at Angel Stadium. Go Halos!

Angels-Car

The Toll Roads Rewards Program

RewardsDid you know if you drive The Toll Roads at least once during the month, you can receive special promotions from a local retail partner as a token of our appreciation?

Monthly deals range from restaurants to theme parks, and whale watching excursions to lift ticket discounts at local mountain resorts. This month’s rewards? The Festival of Arts Pageant of the Masters!

The Toll Roads Rewards members who have opted in to the program and drive at least once in June will be rewarded with 25 percent off Pageant of the Masters tickets and 2-for-1 admission to the Festival of Arts.

It’s simple – just be sure you’re opted-in to receive promotional news and information from The Toll Roads. It’s quick and easy too, here’s how:

  • Visit TheTollRoads.com
  • Log in to your account Login
  • Scroll to the bottom of your account dashboard, to view “Communication Preferences” Sign-Up
  • Here, you can do one of two things:
    • Check the “Yes” button to receive:
      • The Toll Roads Rewards, Promotions, News and other information about The Toll Roads
      • Road Alerts to stay in the know of major road closures, improvements and projects that may impact your drive on The Toll Roads
      • Bi-monthly Environmental Newsletter
    • OR view the left side of your dashboard and simply check the white box that reads “Opt in to Receive Rewards”Sign-Up-All-Set
  • You’re all set!

Once you’ve opted in to receive these communications, drive The Toll Roads at least once a month and a special offer will be emailed to you. Every month you drive, you’ll get a new offer. BONUS: If you’re opted in by the end of June, you’ll also receive $2 off admission to the OC Fair.

See you on The Toll Roads!

 

Upper Chiquita Canyon Conservation Area is a Special Place

If you’ve driven the 241 Toll Road at or near Oso Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita, you’ve seen Upper Chiquita Canyon Conservation Area (UCCCA); you probably even smiled to admire such a rare sight – open space in Orange County.

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UCCCA is the Transportation Corridor Agencies’ (TCA) largest mitigation site. At 1,158 acres, seven Disneyland’s could fit within its boundaries.

Here, you’re surrounded by rolling hills of coastal sage scrub, patches of Prickly Pear Cactus, tiny coastal California Gnatcatchers, and families of deer.IMG_3472

TCA’s Upper Chiquita Canyon Conservation Area was originally planned for residential development and a golf course; however, in 1996, TCA, in partnership with environmental organizations and the resource agencies, placed the nearly 1,200 acres of land into permanent open space.  Conservation of UCCCA plays a critical role in supporting and providing habitat for the federally listed California gnatcatcher and coastal cactus wren.  The site also provides valuable connectivity for wildlife movement between O’Neill Regional Park and Chiquita Ridge to the south.

In 2016 we prayed for rain, but despite the drought, the Gnatcatchers endured. And 2017’s bountiful rain brought out rarely seen reptiles; all at the pristine Upper Chiquita Canyon Conservation Area.

DSC_7696The next time you drive The Toll Roads (State Routes 73, 133, 241 and 261), enjoy the view (and the perks of congestion-free travel!). Most of the slopes and hills adjacent to The Toll Roads were planted with native habitat to blend seamlessly into the surrounding landscape. Thriving native plants have been weaned off supplemental water and fertilizer for decades.

UCCCA is just one of TCA’s 17 open spaces that have been conserved over the past 25 years. Check back soon to see what happens when we provide exclusive access to UCCCA to nearly 40 Plein Air artists to celebrate Earth Day. We can’t wait to see what vibrant and colorful news this spring will bring!

Restoration & Revitalization: 25 Years in the Making

We go together like peas and carrots; green eggs and ham, John Lennon and Yoko Ono. But toll roads and preserving the environment? Yes, it’s true. (Cue the screeching brakes of car coming to a halt.)

Did You Know_Env

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) does more than operate Orange County’s 51-miles of toll roads. TCA protects the natural resources of more than 2,100 acres of habitat and open space in 17 locations. 2,100 acres – that’s about two-and-a-half times as big as New York City’s Central Park!

Protect Eco SystemsIn the 1970s, when Earth Day was getting underway, studies showed the need for new roads to serve Orange County’s growing population. By 1981, the future routes for what would become The Toll Roads, were roughly sketched onto county road plans. By 1990, TCA was working with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Coastal Commission, California Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Federal Highway Administration to secure environmental approvals and permits outlining the mitigation and restoration needed to move forward with construction.

Along The Toll Roads, nature’s bright show has been more than 25 years in the making. The slopes and nearby hillsides were first seeded with a mix of native plants back when The Toll Roads first opened. Custom seed mixes designed for each slope’s sun and moisture conditions sprouted into the mix of wildflowers, sages and shrubs seen today. The sustenance of the area’s California gnatcatcher population over decades is one way we know the planning and planting were successful. Today, the small birds nest in sagebrush and eat insects attracted to the wildflowers and other plants. The colorful spring views for drivers along The Toll Roads are just a beautiful bonus.

Quote NCC

Check out our Environmental Initiatives to learn how TCA has replanted native vegetation, restored habitats for threatened species, conducted scientific studies, removed invasive and non-native plants and improved waterways and creeks.

What is Earth Day?

In 1970, a gallon of gas cost 36 cents and 18-year-olds could vote. In 1970, folks rocked out to the likes of Jimi Hendrix and The Who with a lava lamp in their room. And, specifically on April 22, 1970, Earth Day was born.

Earth-DayAccording to the nonprofit organization Earth Day Network, the first Earth Day celebrations took place at 2,000 colleges and universities across the U.S. and 20 million Americans participated. Inspired by an oil spill off the coast of Santa Barbara in 1969, the intent of Earth Day is to promote change in human behavior and provoke policy changes to protect the Earth our future generations will inherit.

Nearly half a century later, more than one billion people celebrate Earth Day throughout the world. Various events are held to demonstrate support for environmental protection.

How do The Toll Roads celebrate Earth Day? For more than a quarter century, the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) has been a leading agency in environmental stewardship, restoration and preservation. TCA has replanted native vegetation and restored habitats for threatened species at 17 sites throughout Orange County; resulting in more than 2,100 acres of habitat set aside for native animals to continue thrive as Orange County grows.

UCCCA

(Photo: flickr)

And this year, we’re celebrating Earth Day by providing exclusive access to the Upper Chiquita Canyon Conservation Area to nearly 40 Plein Air artists from SOCALPAPA. In French, “plein air” means “open air” or “outside” and the picturesque Upper Chiquita Canyon is a painter’s delight. We’re thrilled to open a pristine outdoor setting that is rarely open to the public, located near the south end of the 241 Toll Road in Rancho Santa Margarita.

Plein Air Painting_SOCALPAPA1

(Photo: SOCALPAPA)

Fun Fact – Earth Day Network has announced their ambitious plan to plant 7.8 billion trees by Earth Day’s 50th Anniversary in 2020. They report “trees are essential tools in the fight for a cleaner, sustainable environment and in one year, a single acre of mature trees absorbs the same amount of carbon dioxide produced by driving the average consumer car 26,000 miles.”

Read on to learn more fun Earth Day facts and stay tuned to see how we prepare for this unique special event.

 

Time: The Perfect Valentine From Start to Finish

If only there were more hours in the day – to spend time with family, read a book, cook a meal, binge watch TV or, better yet, catch some ZZZzzs. It’s too bad, we’re spending more time behind the wheel instead of doing what we want.

Mom Baby Time

According to the Global Traffic Scorecard, an annual study by transportation analytics company Inrix, in 2017, Southern California commuters experienced the most gridlock in the world. The. World.

Thankfully, there is the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads as an option to avoid Orange County’s congested freeways. Not just for commuters, The Toll Roads are also great for day trips and weekend getaways.

Smiles Per Gallon

Heading to Newport Beach? Jump on the 73 Toll Road and bypass all the traffic on the 405 Freeway while you enjoy scenic views. Traveling from Corona to the Irvine Spectrum? Take the 241 and 133 Toll Roads and get there in half the time.

What’s not to love about getting to your destination quicker and with an ETA you can safely predict? For this Valentine’s Day, you don’t have to skip the flowers or chocolate; drive The Toll Roads and arrive on time to meet your Valentine.

Idea of Quality Time

 

Paying Tolls Online Now as Easy as Typing Your License Plate Number

An upgrade to The Toll Roads’ online toll payment option allows drivers who don’t have an existing account to pay online with just a vehicle license plate number. This means drivers no longer need to input where they entered and exited The Toll Roads in order to calculate their toll.

The new system feature is particularly helpful to visitors and those driving The Toll Roads for the first time — and those who only make 2-3 trips a year and choose not to have an account. . Instead of remembering the details of their trip, drivers can use the option to and let the system present the tolls due.

“All you have to do is enter your license plate number and dates of travel online and we’ll calculate the tolls for you,” said Lisa Telles, Chief Communications Officer for the Transportation Corridor Agencies. “We wanted to make it easier than ever for people traveling through Orange County to drive the largest toll road network in California.”

Cameras capture the license plates of vehicles traveling on The Toll Roads. When a driver inputs a license plate number, the online payment system scans the database to identify any unpaid tolls for the date range specified. Once payment is processed, drivers receive a detailed statement with their trip details listed. Drivers who choose to can still use the original method by selecting “I’ll Calculate My Tolls” and enter specific trip details to pay their tolls.

Drivers have five days to pay tolls online, through The Toll Roads mobile app or by phone after driving the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. Users access the online payment system from TheTollRoads.com by choosing “Pay Toll Now.”

Paying tolls for a rental car is even easier. The Toll Roads of Orange County partner with most major rental car companies to allow tolls to be paid through car rental agreements. This minimizes the need to remember paying the toll and removes the potential of a rental car customer receiving a violation from the Toll Roads. Check with individual rental car companies to find out how they bill for tolls and if any additional fees apply.

No matter the reason for a visit to Orange County, driving The Toll Roads is a great way to get there faster and stress-free. Thanks to upgrades to the online payment option, it’s easier than ever for anyone driving The Toll Roads to pay tolls and enjoy driving on 51-miles of congestion-free and stress-free roads.

91 Express Lanes Extended by 8 Miles

Tomorrow morning, FasTrak accountholders will have eight new miles to drive when the Riverside segment of the 91 Express Lanes opens for the morning commute.

The new Riverside segment stretches from the Orange/Riverside County Line to 1.) McKinley Street on State Route 91 and 2.) Ontario Avenue on Interstate 15 South. There will not be direct access to Interstate 15 North from the Express Lanes.

Drivers will be able to travel the existing Orange County segment (between State Route 55 and the Orange/Riverside County Line), the new Riverside segment or the two segments combined for 18 miles of time savings. There will be an entry/exit point at the Orange/Riverside County Line.

Use the 91 Express Lanes and 241 Toll Road in the Same Trip:

Westbound State Route 91 drivers can enter the Express Lanes at McKinley Street (State Route 91) or Ontario Avenue (northbound Interstate 15) and exit at the County Line to access the southbound 241 Toll Road.

Northbound 241 Toll Road drivers can enter the eastbound 91 Express Lanes at the County Line to travel the Express Lanes through Corona.

Paying Tolls:

A toll will be charged for each 91 Express Lanes segment used. Overhead signs at every entry point will display the price for traveling a single segment and the full length of the Express Lanes. Toll rates can also be found at 91ExpressLanes.com.

FasTrak Transponder Required:

All vehicles, including carpoolers, must have a properly mounted FasTrak transponder issued by a California toll agency for toll collection. A transponder can be used to pay tolls on every tolled bridge, lane and road in California. Tolls on the 91 Express Lanes cannot be paid via license plate or with cash.

Carpools of three or more wishing to receive the carpool discount on the 91 Express Lanes must have a FasTrak transponder mounted and travel through the designated HOV3+ lane (the far left lane) at the toll points for both the Orange County and Riverside segments to receive the carpool discount.

Additional Project Improvements:

As part of the Riverside County Transportation Commission’s project, a new general purpose lane is being added in both directions on State Route 91 between State Route 71 and Interstate 15. Auxiliary lanes, interchanges, bridges, ramps and local streets have also been improved through Corona and will open in phases.

More Information:

91ExpressLanes.com/general-info/

 

 

241/91 Driving Courtesy

Anyone who travels between the 241 Toll Road and 91 Freeway knows the challenges that drivers face in this area. Nearly 40,000 cars travel through the northbound Windy Ridge Toll Point every weekday between 3 and 7 p.m.

As those trips descend to the 91 Freeway, they merge with one of the most congested stretches of freeways in the nation.

The significant back up is caused by a lack of capacity or space on the 91 Freeway to accept the commuters merging from the 241 Toll Road. And with the current construction on the 91 Freeway by our transportation partners, the Riverside County Transportation Commission, it’s no surprise that congestion is exacerbated. Long story short, the high demand created by jobs in Orange County and affordable housing in the Inland Empire results in too much traffic for the number of lanes available.

There are four lanes on the northbound 241 Toll Road as drivers approach the 91 Freeway – two on the left merge onto the westbound 91 Freeway and two on the right merge onto the eastbound 91 Freeway.  With the majority of commuters traveling from Orange County to Corona, Riverside and other parts of the Inland Empire, traffic backs up on the 241 Toll Road in the two right lanes, while traffic continues to flow heading west to Anaheim and Yorba Linda. Adding to the bumper-to-bumper frustration are the so-called queue jumpers – drivers who try to bypass the congestion by driving in the left two lanes only to cut-in at the last minute.

These queue-jumpers create more congestion and are a safety hazard. Stopping in free-flow lanes and making an unsafe lane change is illegal. California Highway Patrol (CHP) can cite up to four different vehicle codes when pulling over a driver for unsafe lane changes. If you do this, you can be ticketed, but more importantly, you could cause a major accident.

We see and hear the frustrations our 241 Toll Road drivers share on social media and understand your plight. The Toll Roads of Orange County are working on two efforts to address both these issues:

  1. Short term 241-91-after – To assist CHP with driver safety enforcement, crews recently installed new regulatory signs, raised reflectors and painted a double-double white line for the stretch between the east and west 91 Freeway merge lanes and added markings on the pavement to direct drivers to the correct lanes for their transition to the 91 Freeway. Drivers will see an increase of CHP officers enforcing those who impede traffic or unsafely change lanes. Discourteous drivers, not adhering to the rules, risk getting a citation with a minimum penalty amount of $238. And as our good friend Honk at the OC Register says, “Cutting in at the last moment is rude.

2. Long-term sr241_91hov-6198 – We are working with Caltrans to propose building a direct, median-to-median, tolled connector directly linking the 241 Toll Road to the 91 Express Lanes. This would add an additional option for drivers headed further east into Riverside or down the 15 Freeway to connect directly into the 91 Express Lanes, bypassing any congestion on the existing connector. As part of the environmental phase, a public review period and public hearing was held in fall 2016 to solicit feedback on this proposed project. The final environmental document is expected to be completed in 2018, to learn more, please visit thetollroads.com/241-91connector. Construction of the direct connector may involve hard separation (such as channelizers or a wall barrier) of westbound and eastbound lanes.

So, the next time you drive the northbound 241 Toll Road through the Windy Ridge Toll Point, please remember to be a courteous driver. Stay in the right-hand lanes before you pass the Windy Ridge Toll Point if you are traveling to Riverside County. If you’re heading eastbound on the 91 Freeway, stay out of left lanes when heading down the hill to allow westbound traffic to safely get to their destination. Most of us are rushing out of work to get home and to family functions, but we want to ensure everyone makes it to their destination safe and sound. If you get caught in the westbound lanes, we recommend that you continue west, exit at Weir Canyon and return to the 91 Freeway to head east – that is the safest and most courteous thing to do – and it would make Mom proud!